Why You Need an Employee Net Promotor Score (eNPS)

Employee Net Promoter Score eNPS

Since its creation in 2003, the Net Promoter Score has been adopted by countless businesses as the ultimate gauge for customer loyalty. At Above Benchmark we have been talking about the importance of both the Net Promoter Score and encouraging employees to be brand ambassadors. It’s all well and good to say employees should promote the business for which they work, but how do you actually measure that? Just as the Net Promoter Score (NPS) measures customer loyalty, the eNPS measures employee loyalty.

The Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS) explained:

The eNPS, pioneered by Bain and Company, measures the likelihood of an employee recommending their business as not only a place to work, but also the products/services they sell. It’s not an in-house HR survey about happiness and comfort levels. It is about engagement with the brand, with the result being sales growth. 

Employee engagement directly correlates to increased customer loyalty. In turn, increased customer loyalty correlates with increased sales.

Employee Net Promoter Score

eNPS surveys are traditionally quite short, reduced down to two questions: “Would you recommend us?” and “if not, what can we do to improve?” Some surveys differentiate between recommendations for other potential employees and potential clients/customers. However, while you have the attention of your team, take the opportunity to ask some more questions and really find out what you can do to increase their engagement. Asking questions will lead to a better customer experience and sales growth. Individual employees like to be heard and know they are having an impact, so they will appreciate being asked. 

If you want to assess your employees’ engagement, get in touch with us at Above Benchmark; we’re here to help! Contact us today for a free consult.

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